Shenandoah Spring, On Film

  Portra 160, Canon Elan 7 (35mm)

Portra 160, Canon Elan 7 (35mm)

  Portra 160, 35mm

Portra 160, 35mm

  Portra 160, 35mm

Portra 160, 35mm

  Portra 160, 35mm

Portra 160, 35mm

  Our set of rooms at Skyland and the view from our room.  (Portra 160, 35mm)

Our set of rooms at Skyland and the view from our room. (Portra 160, 35mm)

  Portra 160, 35mm

Portra 160, 35mm

  Portra 160, P645n (medium format)

Portra 160, P645n (medium format)

  Portra 160, medium format

Portra 160, medium format

  Portra 160, medium format

Portra 160, medium format

  Portra 160, medium format

Portra 160, medium format

  Portra 160, medium format

Portra 160, medium format

  Portra 160, medium format

Portra 160, medium format

All I wanted for my birthday present this year was to go to the mountains. In true grass-is-always greener form, I grew up longing for the beach and counting days each year for our summer beach vacation. Now that I live near the ocean where the land is a super flat 9 feet above sea level, it seems all I dream of are rolling hills and the endless vistas of far-away peaks. All (!) I asked was that we go to mountains, and that I not be in charge of any of it. 

So one weekend in May, we picked Cal up early from school, put him behind the wheel and headed west toward the Shenandoah National Park. Partly for our own pleasure, and partly to give Cal some stick time, entered the park at the southernmost tip of Skyline Drive. The lodge we were staying at, Skyland, was roughly at the center of the park, and at 35 MPH, we were told it would take us roughly two hours to reach the lodge.

We took our time. With 75 overlooks along the drive, even I didn't need to stop at each one, but it was hard to pass them up. Neel and Cal, who regularly humor me (and my cameras) knew that this was part of the goal for the trip and they were even more accommodating than usual.

Skyland Resort, where we stayed, was perfect. Things aren't often perfect, but Skyland was. While Neel checked us in, Cal and I sat in rockers in the main lodge and looked out over the valley to the west.  We also checked the animal sighting log book which included lots of deer, chipmunks, a few bear and even a mountain lion! (!!) Our room was a short drive deeper into the valley, but still walking distance to the dining hall, which featured Virginia beers and wines and amazing views across the valley. Our room key even had a tiny flashlight in case our dinner lasted until after dark. (Breakfast was pretty tasty too, by the way.)

Saturday we spent driving. I spent it shooting. We took a hike to the falls that are pictured in my last post (maybe not our best move just a few days out from the flu) and drove the length of the park. We'd been hoping for a repeat of gorgeous stars we'd seen the night before, but we were graced with a stellar thunder storm instead. Fair trade. After the storm, having heard that we'd see bears at twilight, we headed out. Cal drove while Neel and I promised to keep our eyes peeled. Of course Cal spotted the bear. A cub, darting back into the woods. Score!

Next morning, on our way down the mountain, Neel pointed to a sign shaped like a bear on one of the low rock walls that are common along the side of the road. And then the sign hopped of the wall and ambled across the road in front of us. So, two bears. Super exciting.

I hated to have it end. I can feel my heart tug toward those peaks and valleys, and I don't want to have to resist. I'm lucky to live in a place where resisting isn't completely necessary. Blink, and I'm at the ocean. Turn around, and I'm standing on the mountain top. Thank you, Virginia.

Film Notes: Part of the whole exercise for me was simply to enjoy photographing this beautiful space, and to that end, I took three cameras. My 35mm Canon Elan, my Mamiya C330 (whose shots you can see here at Clickin' It Old School) and my Pentax 645n. The Pentax and the Mamiya are both medium format cameras, which have larger negatives than the 35mm. It's really interesting to me (yawn, to the rest of you) to see the difference between the photos from the 35mm and the medium format cameras in this post. Same film, same location, often roughly same time of day. For lots of reasons, I love each of those cameras, but there's no denying that there's a depth to those medium format images that the 35mm images just don't have. Food for thought.

We're headed out on another trip tonight. The dogs are skulking about suspiciously, knowing that when the suitcases come out, the pet sitters come in. And no matter how beloved our pet sitters, our dogs are still suspicious. With a hound and a corgi in the house, "worried" is the default. I know I haven't tended this space well of late, but I'm hoping that with a few weeks off, I'll come back renewed and inspired. In the meantime, I'll be hanging out on Instagram as we travel. Hope to see you there.

under the sea (on film)

Holy flu, batman. Like, seriously. Last Thursday, I was strolling along the oceanfront with my Composition Class, slightly raspy, and by Thursday evening, halfway through an email I started feeling chills. Within the hour, email still unsent, I was in bed with a 103ยบ fever.

Let's not do that again shall we? On Mother's Day, I dragged myself to lunch no matter how bad I felt (and you would too for chicken and waffles with red velvet waffles with maple cream) but halfway through, Neel developed a fever. We're so glad Cal is driving now! We could barely make it home. That's just how we roll around here.

But let's talk of better things, shall we? Not my ongoing raspy cough, or how much my chest hurts or how I've taken to using my kid's inhaler. How about we talk about clear blue skies. Wide, white sand. And the clear green waters of the sea? Oh, and my underwater camera.

That.

She squeals gleefully. We spend so much time in and around the water here that I have long wanted an underwater camera, or at least an underwater housing for my digital camera. Uh, have you seen how pricey those things are? I mean, I know we could GoPro it, but that just didn't appeal. Fits Cal's demo more than mine maybe.

And then I saw this article. And then I frantically/excitedly/gleefully started asking around. And then enter the Nikonos. Designed as a diving camera in the 1960s, and built like a tank, this guy can go fully underwater or shoot some sweet pictures on top of the waves. If I tell you it felt a little weird to walk into the Gulf of Mexico carrying my camera, will you believe me?

But oh, such sweet images. And on my first try! This little guy is a trick to master, so I'm looking forward to spending a lot of time together this summer. Toes in the sand.

All images shot on a Nikonos V with Fuji Superia 400.